Teaching

The handouts for most of my classes are listed below in a reverse chronological order. And why am I listing them here? So I have an extra archive in case the hard drives die and the papers disappear…

Children at events – What about the clothes

Boy stealing cherries, Luttrell Psalter

Boy stealing cherries, Luttrell Psalter

This class was actually less of a class and more of a discussion group and brainstorming session on how to dress children at events. The focus was NOT on making perfect replicas of period clothing, but on useful hints and practical issues, patterns that have been tried out and found working, things to avoid, etc. I should perhaps add that my approach is influenced by the fact that I have 2 lively boys who have a habit of destroying their clothes faster than I can say “Stay put!”, and very limited amount of time for sewing and mending.

The “class” was held at the Aarnimetsä Academy in November 2010 and rerun in July 2011 at Cudgel together with Lady Rikissa.

Children at events – What about the clothes? handout, Aarnimetsä Academy, Nov 2011

Underwear in and around the 14th century

Women and hems, Romance of Alexander, fol. 97v

Women and hems, Romance of Alexander, fol. 97v


Underwear is a topic that seems to have been on my mind in 2003: I taught a class on it at the Aarnimetsä A&S Academy on the 4th-6th of April 2003 (in Finnish) and the Kingdom A&S University in Nordmark on the 7th-9th of November 2003. Also, I have given the same class to a smaller audience in my own canton.

The handouts are almost the same, the Kingdom A&S one just has slightly more pictures.

Underwear class handout, Kingdom A&S University Nov 2003

Saint Brunehilda, Romance of Alexander, fol. 42 verso

Saint Brunehilda, Romance of Alexander, fol. 42 verso

I will boldly add the underwear class notes here too, so you get too read what I said. Now that I read the notes after some years have passed, I find a few places I could criticize myself or a few points I would add:
– From French sources I have found a period drawing of a pattern for skimpy men’s braies. The French have also succeeded convincing me women very rarely wore braies.
– The supporting bathhouse babe underdress does not work for me, so I have been experimenting with binding my breasts. And oh how I rejoiced when I found evidence (from those aforementioned French) how women possibly did that.
– I made an underdress à la Romance of Alexander which fools the eye and makes me look richer: hem and sleeves are made of brocade, otherwise it is just plain linen. Works great! (You can read more about the underdress at A&S entries.)
– On women’s coifs: They are really not that hard to find from period imagery when you know where to look. Thanks to Camilla Luise Dahl and Isis Sturtewagen (Medieval Clothing and Textiles, vol. 4) our eyes have been opened and the cap of St. Birgitta has found it’s way to more re-enactor’s heads I can count! And no, it is not reserved for widows, or always meticulously hidden under other headwear.

Underwear class notes, Kingdom A&S University, Nov 2003

Men’s cotehardies after the mid-14th century

Two men, Roman de la Rose, fol. 67 verso

Two men, Roman de la Rose, fol. 67 verso

Men’s cotehardies / pourpoints / hacketons / doublets / you-name-them have fascinated me since I “discovered” the Charles de Blois pourpoint around 1997, and made my first version of it. (It was baptized the Divorce jacket, because it nearly resulted in one, but that is a whole different tale …)

The class I held in Tallinn at the Kingdom A&S University on the 17th-19th of January 2003 compiles what I then knew about those garments. Needless to say, new research could and should be added. And it is funny how things evolve otherwise too: the handout was made by cutting and glueing, not copy-pasting and photoshopping. Updating would be a challenge…

Men’s cotehardies after the mid-14th century, handout, Kingdom A&S University, Jan 2003

14th century accessories and clothing embellishments

Bling bling! (Handelsgillet, Billy and Charlie, Historic Enterprises, Iloinen Joutsen)

Bling bling! (Handelsgillet, Billy and Charlie, Historic Enterprises, Iloinen Joutsen)

Ah, accessories! The wonderful medieval bits and pieces, the necessary things and the unnecessary bling bling! The embellishments you can’t go without!

I held this class in Tallinn at the Kingdom A&S University on the 17th-19th of January 2003. The handout is put together using the good old-fashioned cut-and-glue method, so when I held this class again at Cudgel in 2011, I “updated” some bits just by talking about them, and by printing out a new list of references.

14th century accessories and clothing embellishments, handout, Kingdom A&S University, Jan 2003

14th century accessories and clothing embellishments, additional sources, Cudgel, July 2011

What a man wore in the 14th century?

Dancers, Roman de la Rose

Dancers, Roman de la Rose

or actually, “Mitä miehellä oli yllään 1300-luvulla”, because I held this class in Finnish. It took place at the Aarnimetsä A&S Academy event on the 7th-8th of September 2002. And before someone thinks I have the memory of an elephant, I must confess I probably wouldn’t remember the dates unless I hadn’t happened to find the event schedule: I was then in charge of arranging the teaching.

This was the first time I tried to put together my knowledge on masculine upper body garments. A year later I already knew a bit more.

Surprise surprise, the handout is in Finnish.

Mitä miehellä oli yllään 1300-luvulla, handout, Aarnimetsä Academy, September 2002

Documentation

or “Dokumentointi”, for this class was held in Finnish. I gave the class at the Aarnimetsä A&S Academy event on the 7th-8th of September 2002. (See “What a man wore in the 14th century” if you want to know how I can remember the dates…)

There was a perception at the time that documentations for A&S competitions had to equal university-level research papers, and I wanted people to be less afraid of documenting and more keen on entering. My main point was that for Kingdom A&S competitions, an A6-sized card with some essential information was enough. Oh and the handout is in Finnish.

Dokumentointi, handout, Aarnimetsä Academy, September 2002

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